WR MIKE DAVIS, TEXAS

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6’2” – 195 lbs. – 4.45e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2010: 47 – 478 – 2 (10.2)
2011: 45 – 609 – 1 (13.5)
2012: 57 – 939 – 7 (16.5)

OVERVIEW:

Started five of eleven games played as a freshman, setting the Texas single-season record for receptions. Appeared in thirteen games again as a sophomore, leading the top in receptions while making eleven starts. As a junior, started eleven of thirteen again, leading the team in yards and touchdowns. Started ten of eleven games played in 2013.

POSITIVES:

•    Will graduate having been a major contributor for all four seasons at a major program.
•    Has a nice combination of height, length for an outside receiver at the next level.
•    Capable of challenging defenses downfield with his speed, a bit of a long-strider.
•    Catches a lot of screens at Texas, has some shiftiness to gain yards after the catch.
•    Can adjust to balls thrown away from his frame, capable of bringing in low balls.
•    Demonstrates nice body control down the sidelines, awareness of the field of play.
•    Generally a high-motor blocker, also can be quite effective when he is able to lock on.

NEGATIVES:

•    Has a thin build, which may make it difficult for him to release against press coverage.
•    Rounds off his routes a bit, needs a lot of work in terms of cleaning up his breaks.
•    Forced to make plenty of contested catches because his cuts don’t create separation.
•    Doesn’t run many different routes, tends to rely on screens or sloppy deep patterns.
•    Lets passes get into his frame at times, dropping ones he should be able to catch.
•    Seems like he may be able to contribute as a punt returner but didn’t in college.

SUMMARY:

Davis produced in each of his four seasons at Texas, and may have been even more successful if not for some questionable quarterback play. He is a tall, thin, long-limbed receiver who relied almost exclusively on a combination of deep routes and screens with the Longhorns, looking dangerous in both regards, although his ability to get behind defensive backs will be more limited in the NFL unless he is able to add some more routes to his game, as well as clean up the routes he does run in order to create additional separation, as even in college, defenders were more overmatched athletically than intellectually. Considering Davis’ thin build, it’s fair to wonder whether or not he will be successful against press coverage. Still, teams may be interested in trying to develop him further, either as a flanker or as a split end.

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