IB C.J. MOSLEY, ALABAMA

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6’2” – 238 lbs. – 4.65e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2010: 67 – 1.5 – 0.5, 2 QBH, 10 PD, 2 INT (2 TD)
2011: 36 – 4.5 – 2.0, 2 PD, 1 INT
2012: 107 – 8.0 – 4.0, 3 QBH, 1 FF, 1 FR, 2 PD, 2 INT (1 TD)

OVERVIEW:

Finished third on Alabama in tackles with a true freshman, then became a member of the starting unit for six of the eleven games in which he played in 2011, missing two games with a dislocated elbow. Started at weakside linebacker as a junior, earning a first-team All-SEC selection.

STRENGTHS:

•    Will graduate with four years of experience for a major college program.
•    Could realistically play WLB or MLB in a 4-3 defense, WILB in a 3-4.
•    Extremely instinctive player who’s almost always in the right position.
•    Forceful, explosive hitter who consistently tackles with proper form.
•    Better at taking on/shedding blocks than anticipated given his size.
•    Works through trash well, but can also run around blockers if needed.
•    Very effective in coverage, whether zone or man versus tight ends.
•    Capable blitzer who is frequently employed on twists and stunts.
•    High-motor player, which combines with speed to offer great range.
•    Versatile enough that he can remain on the field for any situation.

WEAKNESSES:

•    A little bit undersized for teams seeking a 4-3 SLB or 3-4 SILB.
•    Covers tight ends in college but size may present difficulties in the pros.
•    Will he be as effective when anchoring against NFL blockers?
•    Occasionally takes a false step when presented with misdirection.
•    Some minor durability concerns must be investigated further.

SUMMARY:

There’s not really anything Mosley can’t do well on the field, which, combined with his extensive experience in Nick Saban’s scheme at Alabama, should translate to being selected high in the first round, potentially in the top ten. His instincts, work ethic, physicality, and versatility make him one of the draft’s most well-rounded players, with the only potential concern being how his coverage-and-block-shedding skills will translate to the bigger tight ends and offensive linemen found in the NFL. However, there’s nothing on his tape to suggest that transitioning will be a problem.  RD 1

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