DT DANNY SHELTON, WASHINGTON

DT #71 DANNY SHELTON, WASHINGTON

6’2” – 332 lbs. – 5.35e

Massive nose tackle who usually lined up in the middle of Washington’s three-man fronts, but took snaps as a five-technique left defensive end as well; played the one-technique when the Huskies fielded an extra down lineman. Capable of using his sheer size and strength to overwhelm single blockers, with an initial jolt which can decisively determine engagements; demands additional attention from opposing offensive lines. Has a knack for wiggling between two blockers when faced with a double-team, although teams did indicate a willingness to attempt to engage him with a single blocker more often than might be expected given his physical attributes. Consistently holds his ground or resets the line of scrimmage in the run game, very rarely gives up ground to opposing blockers. Mentally-sound player who locates the ball well and avoids compromising his defense’s run fits by freelancing. Quality block-shedder who positions his hands well and is capable of tossing blockers aside quickly and exploding into contact on runners. Possesses the height and weight of a two-gap nose, but appears to lack ideal arm length, which constrains his ability to make tackles away from his frame; runners often slip out of his grasp. Also has a tendency to get a bit high in his stance, something which has not had a significant effect on his play in college, but might pose problems against pro linemen, who are physically and technically superior to their NCAA counterparts. However, should be considered a “plus” run defender who is capable of handling nose tackle responsibilities in any defensive scheme, preferably a two-gap 3-4. When attempting to penetrate into the backfield, employs an underrated swim move, mixing in a rip and a swim on occasion as well. Faster than his frame would seem to indicate, with the ability to put some pressure on quarterbacks, although perhaps not enough to pursue and finish his rushes; additionally, gives good effort and displays unexpected stamina on passing downs, but is likely only a two-down player at the next level. Does what he does well, but fills a role which is being increasingly marginalized in today’s game, as evidenced by Notre Dame nose tackle Louis Nix’s slide into the third round in 2014. Should benefit from the recent success of former Huskies nose tackle Alameda Ta’amu.

Games watched: Colorado (’13), Stanford (’13), UCLA (’13)

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