WR DRES ANDERSON, UTAH

WR #6 DRES ANDERSON, UTAH

6’2” – 190 lbs. – 4.55e

Looks bigger than his listed weight; possesses prototypical height and length for a boundary receiver. Has pro bloodlines. Was productive as a junior, but could have been even more prolific with quality quarterback play. Has experience lining up both on and off the line of scrimmage. Strong enough to release against press coverage; also does a good job of using his physicality to make contested catches. Could give more consistent effort as a blocker, but is generally effective. Comfortable running routes over the middle, with the build to stay healthy while doing so at the pro level. Complements his underneath routes with deep posts and go routes. Frequently utilized in catch-and-run situations: coming off of screens, running shallow crosses and drags, etc. Length gives him a considerable catch radius and the ability to bring in balls away from his frame. Has also worked as a kick returner. Receives the occasional reverse after going in motion, but is most commonly employed as a decoy in those situations. Powerful, but an unimaginative, straight-line runner with the ball in his hands. Double-catches too many balls; doesn’t routinely stop throws on initial contact. Also commits plenty of concentration drops. Lacks refinement as a route-runner, with a very basic tree in which shallow crosses and go routes predominate. Smooth, but may struggle to separate downfield as often at the next level as he did in college due to what appears to be a lack of elite top-end speed; is he a deceptively-fast long strider, or someone who will be limited to underneath routes? Must improve his awareness versus zone in order to avoid running himself into coverage. An effortless mover who possesses obvious physical gifts, but someone who currently leans too heavily on natural advantages and must develop his game in all facets before he can be considered a complete receiver; without diversifying his route tree, it will be easy for opponents to anticipate his responsibilities on a snap-to-snap basis, as defenses haven’t had to respect the possibility of many intermediate routes. Perhaps more disconcerting, his hands don’t inspire much confidence. By paying more attention to detail as a senior, teams could feel they have a starter on their hands, but plenty of work remains to be done.

Games watched: Arizona St. (’13), Stanford (’13), UCLA (’13)

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