DT Tyler Shelvin, Louisiana St.* (6’3”, 346)

Background:

Four-star recruit who was an academic redshirt for his true freshman season, then was suspended for two weeks of the following season, serving as a backup. Posted 39-3.0-0.0 as the starting nose tackle during his sophomore year, then opted out of the past season before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Girth, girth, and girth; they don’t make nose tackles much bigger than this. Lines up as a zero technique and is a real handful to deal with. Plays with a low pad level and is able to anchor well at the line of scrimmage against opponents. Gets good extension with his arms to lock out opponents and flashes the ability to shed. Has a surprisingly quick first step for someone his size, coming out of his stance low and with some suddenness. Not a major threat to penetrate but is capable of creating some movement to collapse the pocket and attract other blockers. Flashes a rip move and a swim counter to add some variety to his approach. Gives good effort in pursuit.

Negatives:

Really only put together one productive season at the college level before declaring. As may be expected for a player of his size, was more of a rotational player than an every-down option. Can struggle to disengage in time to make tackles even when he’s in range. Some issues with balance crop up periodically. Ends too many snaps in the passing game idling near the line of scrimmage. Gives effort to pursue but is basically the phone-booth block-eater his size would indicate. Plays a position which is becoming less and less relevant in the modern game.

Summary:

Has more suddenness and a better motor than is typical for two-gap nose tackle prospects, but as may be expected, his calling card is really his sheer size and mass. From a physical standpoint, looks like an ideal rotational run-stuffing candidate for a team which runs an odd defensive front that employs a zero technique who can attack opposing blockers and dig in at the line. Draft stock will depend on how much teams value that kind of skillset in the smaller, more passing-oriented modern game.

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