DE Logan Hall, Houston

6’6” – 278 lbs.

Background:

Picked up fourteen tackles in each of his first two seasons with the Cougars, being listed at just 241 pounds in both campaigns. Bulked up to 260 for his junior year and posted 23-2.0-1.0 over eight games, then got up to 275 as a junior and went 47-13.0-6.0 this past year.

Positives:

Has an excellent combination of height and length, and added over thirty pounds to his frame since arriving on campus; could potentially fit as a five-technique or as a 4-3 base end who kicks inside on passing downs. Plays the game with toughness, physicality, and an impressive motor. Shows the ability to scrape laterally in the run game, with above-average lateral quickness. Upper-body strength is good, with heavy, active hands to discard blockers. Good reaction times to the ball being snapped. Flashes the ability to explode off the line, get low, and knife into the backfield with his first step, forcing quarterbacks off-platform or disrupting run designs. Can walk back blockers with his bull-rush when he gets his legs driving. Works in effective swim and spin moves. Improved his play as the season went on.

Negatives:

Has just one year of production under his belt. Played the three-technique in college, but is undersized for it at the pro level, so will have to either bulk up or switch positions. Drops his head too often, preventing him from being able to locate the ball. Has issues with balance on far too many snaps; ends up in the dirt much more than he should by bending at the waist. Pad level will also rise out of his stance at times and is taller than a typical interior defensive lineman. Has the length and grip strength teams look for, but doesn’t get consistent extension with his arms and hand placement is too often on the outside of an opposing blocker’s frame. Gets wiped out by double teams. Doesn’t always keep his shoulders square when flowing to the ball, causing him to get driven off of his spot.

Summary:

 Has a lot of the physical and athletic tools teams look for in a pro defensive lineman, but is still a long way off in terms of his technique and polish, and might be looking at a position change at the next level, given that he’s likely too tall and light to play on the interior for most teams. Would probably fit best as a five-technique in either an even or odd front, but is the type of raw, boom-or-bust prospect who will likely require a long gestation period under a high-quality defensive line coach to reach his potential.

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