Category: Center

OC HRONISS GRASU, OREGON

OC #55 HRONISS GRASU, OREGON

6’3” – 297 lbs. – 5.15e

Redshirted in 2010; started every game in each of the following seasons and will enter his senior year having started forty games. Combination of height and weight is adequate for the center position, although his frame looks nearly maxed-out; arms look a bit short. Stronger than he looks, with the ability to anchor against nose tackles and generate push in the running game; dominated massive Washington nose tackle Danny Shelton as a junior. Rarely requires additional help from offensive guards. Does a good job of keeping his feet churning after initial contact. Aggressive, even if he doesn’t end many plays with pancakes. Works hard to sustain until the whistle; has a strong grip which allows him to lock onto opponents. Gets good arm extension. Assignment-sound in pass protection, blocking the appropriate player and switching when necessary. Durable, pro-ready, and intelligent. Makes all of the protection calls. Reliable, experienced shotgun-snapper. Not a freak athlete, but is athletic enough to get out in front of screens, with a great work rate. Looks more comfortable when he’s asked to make second-level blocks on linebackers without pulling; straight-line speed is above-average. Ultimately, should be able to fit into either a man or zone blocking scheme. Height gives him natural leverage, but occasionally squanders it by getting too upright. Hands find their way outside too frequently. A bit more comfortable versus the bull rush than against quicker, gap-shooting defensive tackles; susceptible to penetration to either side. Lacks a forceful punch to jolt defenders. Hasn’t played any other positions, limiting his appeal as a potential swing reserve. Should certainly be considered a candidate to be the first center selected in this year’s draft, given his highly-productive, highly-experienced collegiate career; was given some difficult assignments with the Ducks and performed admirably. Not the biggest or most mobile center, but is close to a finished product and has shown that he is capable of holding up against powerful nose tackles without help, something which allows for rare flexibility in blocking schemes; additionally, his high football IQ allows him to execute his assignments even without outstanding athleticism. Projects as a starting pivot in the pros.

Games watched: Oregon St. (’13), Stanford (’13), Washington (’13)

Advertisements