Category: Uncategorized

QB Danny Etling, Louisiana St.

6’3” – 222 lbs. – 4.76

Profile:

  • Originally attended Purdue, and started seven of eight games played as a true freshman. Started the first five games of the subsequent season, but struggled and ended up losing the starting job. Transferred to Louisiana St., sitting out a year, and then started ten games as a junior and all thirteen as a senior, enjoying his most efficient season.

Positives:

  • Started thirty-five games over four seasons; has a pretty good growth trajectory, improving in each of the last two seasons. Looked a little bit thin on tape, but size and bulk are adequate for a pro passer. Worked primarily out of the shotgun but appears to have pretty clean footwork on his three-step dropbacks. Able to get the ball out quickly on predetermined reads when working the short passing/screen game. Throws a soft, catchable ball with appropriate touch, including downfield. Has a good feel for timing with his deep throws and was able to feed D.J. Chark downfield. Able to drop his arm angle if needed. Did a good job of protecting the ball this past year. Flashes the ability to climb the pocket or extend the play. Has enough athleticism to pick up the occasional first-down on designed quarterback runs, or to roll out on bootlegs and find receivers in the short passing game.

Negatives:

  • Checkdown-heavy passer who relies on timing instead of raw arm strength. Doesn’t always step into his throws. Accuracy/ball placement is questionable at best, especially the further his throws are from the line of scrimmage. Even when presented with a clean pocket, has a tendency to overthrow receivers, and struggled to complete passes on the run during the games reviewed. Only topped 60% completion percentage in one season, although his accuracy ticked upward in his final two seasons. Eats a lot of sacks for a quarterback who rarely throws the ball. Very inconsistent on a game-to-game basis.

Summary:

  • Game-manager type who was able to limit mistakes and protect the football this past season, but who projects as a career backup because he is a frustratingly inaccurate and inconsistent passer, especially for someone who throws most of his balls less than ten yards downfield. Projects as more of a practice-squad/number three option with a somewhat low ceiling.
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WR Braxton Berrios, Miami (FL)

5’9” – 184 lbs. – 4.44

Profile:

  • Started four of twelve games as a freshman, enjoying modest production (21-232-3), then saw his output drop off the following year. Started three games as a junior, with a season somewhat similar to his first, also serving as a punt returner. His final season was his only one with significant output (55-679-9), and came playing in the slot. Team captain.

Positives:

  • Despite his small stature, has adequate hand size for a pro receiver. Route tree is pretty standard for a slot receiver, with a lot of slants, ins and outs, drags, and screens, but is able to execute them pretty well. Gets up to speed quickly, with good burst off the line of scrimmage. Runs a lot of routes over the middle of the field; willing to take a hit in order to catch a ball. Uses what size he has to shield defenders. Not just a short-area receiver; has the speed to threaten the seams against zone coverage. Exhibits plus body control to adjust to passes. High-percentage target with reliable hands. Gives good effort as a stalk blocker in the run game; works hard to stick with opponents through the snap. Has experience returning punts and ran one back for a touchdown as a junior.

Negatives:

  • Short with 28” arms; physical profile will limit him to a slot-only role on offense. Can catch passes away from his frame, but probably needs to play with an accurate quarterback because of his lack of length. Might struggle to release at the line of scrimmage against bump-and-run coverage at the next level. A bit of a one-speed player. Doesn’t always exhibit enough snap at the route stem; relied a little too much on his natural athleticism. Had only one productive season at the college level. Tore his ACL in 2014.

 Summary:

  • An undersized slot receiver and punt returner with impressive burst and speed, and who offers reliable hands and the ability to contort his body and adjust to poorly-thrown balls. He gets up to speed in a hurry and unlike some of the pros he’s been compared to, does a good job of threatening the seam against zone coverage. A relatively known quantity with a high floor and the ceiling of an effective number three receiver, he looks like a mid-round pick who would thrive if paired with an accurate quarterback who could mitigate his lack of size and length.

LB Christian Sam, Arizona St.

6’2” – 244 lbs. – 4.75

Profile:

  • Played safety in high school. Rotated into the defense as a reserve in his first season with the Sun Devils, then put together a highly productive sophomore campaign over thirteen starts the following year. Sustained a season-ending foot injury in his first game of 2016, then came back and put together his best season in 2017, finishing with 127-9.5-3.0.

Positives:

  • Was highly productive over his two seasons in the starting lineup. Has adequate (if not quite desirable) size for a linebacker in either defensive front. There’s some natural power to his game. Likes to play downhill and thump between the tackles in the run game, but isn’t exclusively a “phone booth” type of player; can get outside the hashes a little bit as well. Made a lot of tackles in the backfield this past season. Has some pop as a hitter to help set the tone defensively. Pretty reliable tackler who has just average length but gets the most of it; has big hands, a strong grip, and does a good job of making stops in his area. Stayed on the field on passing downs at the college level. Does a good job of keeping the play in front of him in zone coverage. Looks smooth when shuffling. Can jam receivers at the line of scrimmage to disrupt route timing.

Negatives:

  • Not a particularly fast, quick, or explosive athlete. Can be fooled by window dressing and get caught out of position; instincts leave something to be desired. Overruns too many spots as a run defender; could play with more patience and discipline. Lets blockers into his pads and doesn’t disengage or drop his anchor effectively enough. Probably a two-down player at best. Quarterbacks were able to freeze him or pull him up with play fakes. Looks a little lumbering in his drops and size/athletic limitations may prevent him from matching up with anyone in man coverage at the next level. Season-ending foot injury will require further medical evaluation. Doesn’t appear to have the athleticism for special teams.

 Summary:

  • Seems like a little bit less than the sum of his parts; has a pretty thick build, adequate athleticism, and plenty of production as a tackler in a major conference, but no elements of his game really stand out. Doesn’t take on blocks or read keys as well as a two-down thumper should, and might be limited in coverage as well. More of a late-round possibility for those reasons.

LB Ja’Whuan Bentley, Purdue

6’2” – 246 lbs. – 4.75

Profile:

  • Started all twelve games as a true freshman, but saw his subsequent season end five games into the season after sustaining a knee injury during practice. Started eight of nine games played as a junior, and then made twelve starts this past season in his most productive campaign. First three-time captain in Purdue’s history.

Positives:

  • Tough, physical player with excellent leadership skills and a nonstop motor; plays with a sense of urgency and likes to thump between the tackles. Comes with essentially three years of productive starting experience in a major conference. Has a throwback build, with a very thick frame and a lot of power. Able to read keys and flow in the play direction. Likes to take on blockers and can crush fullbacks in the hole. Plays downhill and made a lot of his tackles in the backfield. Pretty disciplined with his run fits. Stays square and can deliver pop on contact to set the tone defensively. Stayed on the field on passing downs at the college level. Flashed the ability to place his hands and carry backs and tight ends as a junior, a season in which he looked more athletic.

Negatives:

  • Marginal athleticism may constrain his upside as a pro; looked like he was playing at over 260 pounds this past season, then dropped to 246 for his pro day but still put up very mediocre testing numbers. Not really a true sideline-to-sideline player in the run game. Has a better feel for playing the run than he does in coverage. Doesn’t cover a lot of ground with his drops and is probably a spy/robber type of player who can’t be left in man coverage against opposing backs, receivers, or tight ends; consequently, will probably be a two-down player at best. Temperamentally suited to special teams but doesn’t have the type of athleticism that core special-teamers usually bring. Medical issues raise questions which will require further examination.

 Summary:

  • Something of an anachronism now that the NFL has shifted away from big, powerful run stuffers and toward athletic coverage specialists with range. Seems like a pretty straightforward evaluation in that he comes with plus size, has extensive starting experience in a major conference, and does what he does well, but who also has clear athletic limitations which will likely prevent him from being an every-down starter. Probably more of a late-round option who projects as a backup inside linebacker in a 3-4.

 

WR Tre’Quan Smith, Central Florida

6’2” – 203 lbs. – 4.49

Misc:

  • Well-built receiver with good height and a strong frame. Does some work on the outside but is often lined up in the slot.

Positives:

  • Able to use a swim move to release at the line of scrimmage, and is strong enough to continue his routes through some contact. Has the toughness to come down with contested passes in traffic, important considering that he wasn’t able to get consistent separation each week. Flashes the ability to lull defensive backs into a false sense of security by changing speeds when working downfield; looked like a serious deep threat out of the slot at times. Does a good job of positioning himself to win 50-50 passes, and his quarterback clearly had confidence in him in those types of situations. Climbs the ladder and wins over the top. Can track and adjust to poorly thrown balls; has the length and hands to pluck away from his frame. Some ability to improvise and create opportunities for his quarterback when the play breaks down. Has some shake and enough power to run through tackles with the ball in his hands; fights for additional yardage after the contact. Physical blocker who extends his arms, keeps defenders out of his frame, and works to stick with them through the whistle. Some ability to improvise when the play breaks down.

Negatives:

  • A lot of his production is manufactured on short throws which take advantage of generous cushions; gets a lot of touches on short digs two or three yards down the field. Beyond those patterns and go routes, tree is simple at this point. Has a tendency to take it easy on routes in which he’s not the primary target; doesn’t always go full speed. Ran well at the Combine, but looks better when he’s able to settle into soft spots against zone coverage; flashes the ability to put defenders in his hip pocket in some games and really struggles to threaten defenses in others. Will need to play with a quarterback who trusts him to catch passes in tight coverage. Makes some

 Summary:

 A prospect who looks like a dangerous deep threat out of the slot in some games, and who struggles to distinguish himself in others. Size, athleticism, and potential to make acrobatic catches away from his frame should attract teams looking for a high-upside receiver in the third or fourth round.

Final 2018 Mock Draft

  1. Cleveland Browns – QB Sam Darnold, Southern California
  2. New York Giants – RB Saquon Barkley, Penn St.
  3. New York Jets – QB Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma
  4. Cleveland Browns – DE Bradley Chubb, North Carolina St.
  5. Denver Broncos – CB Denzel Ward, Ohio St.
  6. Indianapolis Colts – LB Roquan Smith, Georgia
  7. Tampa Bay Buccaneers – DB Derwin James, Florida St.
  8. Chicago Bears – OG Quenton Nelson, Notre Dame
  9. San Francisco 49ers – CB Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama
  10. Oakland Raiders – OT Kolton Miller, UCLA
  11. Miami Dolphins – LB Tremaine Edmunds, Virginia Tech
  12. Buffalo Bills – QB Josh Allen, Wyoming
  13. Washington Redskins – DT Vita Vea, Washington
  14. Green Bay Packers – CB Joshua Jackson, Iowa
  15. Arizona Cardinals – QB Josh Rosen, UCLA
  16. Baltimore Ravens – WR Calvin Ridley, Alabama
  17. Los Angeles Chargers – LB Rashaan Evans, Alabama
  18. Seattle Seahawks – DE Marcus Davenport, Texas-San Antonio
  19. Dallas Cowboys – LB Leighton Vander Esch, Boise St.
  20. Detroit Lions – DT Da’Ron Payne, Alabama
  21. Cincinnati Bengals – OC Frank Ragnow, Arkansas
  22. Buffalo Bills – CB Jaire Alexander, Louisville
  23. New England Patriots – QB Lamar Jackson, Louisville
  24. Carolina Panthers – WR D.J. Moore, Maryland
  25. Tennessee Titans – DE Sam Hubbard, Ohio St.
  26. Atlanta Falcons – DT Taven Bryan, Florida
  27. New Orleans Saints – TE Hayden Hurst, South Carolina
  28. Pittsburgh Steelers – DB Justin Reid, Stanford
  29. Jacksonville Jaguars – OG Will Hernandez, Texas-El Paso
  30. Minnesota Vikings – OG Billy Price, Ohio St.
  31. San Francisco 49ers – OT Mike McGlinchey, Notre Dame
  32. Detroit Lions – DE Harold Landry, Boston College

Projected Top 100 Draftees (By Position) (FINAL)

  1. QB Josh Allen, Wyoming
  2. QB Sam Darnold, Southern California
  3. QB Luke Falk, Washington St.
  4. QB Lamar Jackson, Louisville
  5. QB Kyle Lauletta, Richmond
  6. QB Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma
  7. QB Josh Rosen, UCLA
  8. QB Mason Rudolph, Oklahoma St.
  9. RB Kalen Ballage, Arizona St.
  10. RB Saquon Barkley, Penn St.
  11. RB Nick Chubb, Georgia
  12. RB Derrius Guice, Louisiana St.
  13. RB Kerryon Johnson, Auburn
  14. RB Ronald Jones II, Southern California
  15. RB Sony Michel, Georgia
  16. RB Rashaad Penny, San Diego St.
  17. WR D.J. Chark, Louisiana St.
  18. WR Michael Gallup, Colorado St.
  19. WR DaeSean Hamilton, Penn St.
  20. WR Christian Kirk, Texas A&M
  21. WR Anthony Miller, Memphis
  22. WR D.J. Moore, Maryland
  23. WR Dante Pettis, Washington
  24. WR Calvin Ridley, Alabama
  25. WR Equanimeous St. Brown, Notre Dame
  26. WR Courtland Sutton, Southern Methodist
  27. WR James Washington, Oklahoma St.
  28. TE Mark Andrews, Oklahoma
  29. TE Mike Gesicki, Penn St.
  30. TE Dallas Goedert, South Dakota St.
  31. TE Hayden Hurst, South Carolina
  32. OT Orlando Brown, Oklahoma
  33. OT Geron Christian, Louisville
  34. OT Tyrell Crosby, Oregon
  35. OT Mike McGlinchey, Notre Dame
  36. OT Kolton Miller, UCLA
  37. OT Joseph Noteboom, Texas Christian
  38. OT Brian O’Neill, Pittsburgh
  39. OT Chukwuma Okorafor, Western Michigan
  40. OT Martinas Rankin, Mississippi St.
  41. OT Connor Williams, Texas
  42. OG Austin Corbett, Nevada
  43. OG Will Hernandez, Texas-El Paso
  44. OG Quenton Nelson, Notre Dame
  45. OG Isaiah Wynn, Georgia
  46. OC Mason Cole, Michigan
  47. OC James Daniels, Iowa
  48. OC Billy Price, Ohio St.
  49. OC Frank Ragnow, Arkansas
  50. DT Taven Bryan, Florida
  51. DT P.J. Hall, Sam Houston St.
  52. DT B.J. Hill, North Carolina St.
  53. DT Maurice Hurst, Michigan
  54. DT Derrick Nnadi, Florida St.
  55. DT Da’Ron Payne, Alabama
  56. DT Harrison Phillips, Stanford
  57. DT Tim Settle, Virginia Tech
  58. DT Nathan Shepherd, Fort Hays St.
  59. DT Vita Vea, Washington
  60. DE Bradley Chubb, North Carolina St.
  61. DE Marcus Davenport, Texas-San Antonio
  62. DE Duke Ejiofor, Wake Forest
  63. DE Rasheem Green, Southern California
  64. DE Da’Shawn Hand, Alabama
  65. DE Jeff Holland, Auburn
  66. DE Sam Hubbard, Ohio St.
  67. DE Arden Key, Louisiana St.
  68. DE Harold Landry, Boston College
  69. DE Josh Sweat, Florida St.
  70. DE Chad Thomas, Miami (FL)
  71. DE Kemoko Turay, Rutgers
  72. LB Jerome Baker, Ohio St.
  73. LB Lorenzo Carter, Georgia
  74. LB Tremaine Edmunds, Virginia Tech
  75. LB Rashaan Evans, Alabama
  76. LB Shaquem Griffin, Central Florida
  77. LB Malik Jefferson, Texas
  78. LB Josey Jewell, Iowa
  79. LB Darius Leonard, South Carolina St.
  80. LB Uchenna Nwosu, Southern California
  81. LB Ogbonnia Okoronkwo, Oklahoma
  82. LB Roquan Smith, Georgia
  83. LB Leighton Vander Esch, Boise St.
  84. CB Jaire Alexander, Louisville
  85. CB Anthony Averett, Alabama
  86. CB Carlton Davis, Auburn
  87. CB Mike Hughes, Central Florida
  88. CB Donte Jackson, Louisiana St.
  89. CB Joshua Jackson, Iowa
  90. CB Isaiah Oliver, Colorado
  91. CB Denzel Ward, Ohio St.
  92. DB Jessie Bates III, Wake Forest
  93. DB Terrell Edmunds, Virginia Tech
  94. DB Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama
  95. DB Ronnie Harrison, Alabama
  96. DB Derwin James, Florida St.
  97. DB Tarvarius Moore, Southern Mississippi
  98. DB Justin Reid, Stanford
  99. DB Kyzir White, West Virginia
  100. PK Daniel Carlson, Auburn

DB Justin Reid, Stanford

6’1” – 204 lbs. – 4.55

Profile: 

  • Has pro bloodlines; brother Eric most recently played safety for the San Francisco 49ers. Functioned as essentially a nickel defender at the college level; took snaps closer to or further from the line of scrimmage, but typically lines up across from an opposing slot receiver rather than as more of a traditional deep safety or box safety.

Positives:

  • Has good size for a pro defensive back; checks all the boxes from a physical perspective. Has good instincts and a conservative on-field temperament, minimizing big plays and mental errors. Footwork and balance in his backpedal is sound. Offers plus route recognition and impressive hips for a player of his size, allowing him to anticipate what opposing slot receivers are trying to do and stick with them despite his lack of ideal top-end speed. When working in press coverage, can place his hands and use them to stick with opponents. Doesn’t bite on double moves or give up too much separation at the route stem. Teams generally avoided throwing in his direction, and exhibited good ball skills to make plays when in-phase. Looks like a pretty good tackler who takes solid angles in pursuit and can break down in the open field; more of a reliable wrap-tackler than a big-hitting enforcer. Was also asked to do some limited blitzing off the edge.

Negatives:

  • Although he has the type of size and athleticism to potentially play as more of a typical free safety or strong safety, he’s a bit of a projection there because of his lack of snaps, meaning he might need to begin his career as a nickel defender. Will get grabby with opponents from time to time and may have to resort to that sort of tactic if he’s forced to cover legitimate deep threats in man coverage at the pro level. Can get caught in traffic when trying to cover drag patterns across the middle of the field. Most of his work was against opposing receivers as opposed to tight ends.

Summary:

  • A very consistent nickel defender with an impressive combination of size, instincts, and fluidity which should allow him to see significant snaps as a rookie. Could potentially handle a variety of roles but requires some projection to a traditional safety position given his limited snaps in deep coverage, at least during the games reviewed. A high-floor prospect with a skillset well-suited to the modern game and who should receive plenty of consideration in the first round of the draft.

WR Michael Gallup, Colorado St.*

6’1” – 205 lbs. – 4.51

Profile: 

  • Originally attended Butler Community College, then transferred to Colorado St. and enjoyed two highly productive seasons before declaring for the draft. Solidly built receiver who lines up on the outside, splitting snaps pretty evenly between the left and right sides of the field.

Positives: 

  • Very productive at the college level. Good route-runner who had enough speed to challenge defenses deep at the college level but was at his best when working underneath or catching screens. Does a lot of his work over the middle of the field, running slants and other short patterns, and has the concentration and toughness to hang on through contact. Knows how to keep defenders in his hip pocket. Plays bigger and stronger than his size would suggest. Able to get physical with opposing defensive backs when playing against press coverage; might create a little bit too much contact at the route stem at times, creating the possibility of drawing offensive pass interference penalties, but can hold his own when matched up against chippy opponents. Has good awareness and footwork near the sideline, with plus flexibility/body control to adjust to poorly-thrown balls. Has very reliable hands and maximizes his length. Dangerous with the ball in his hands; very good burst in the screen game. Works hard to stick with opponents when stalking for screens.

Negatives: 

  • At times, can be pinned to the sideline effectively and driven out of the field of play by bigger opponents. Runs what routes he has well, but didn’t appear to have a particularly diverse repertoire of intermediate patterns in college and may not be quite fast enough to qualify as a deep threat at the pro level, either, although as mentioned previously, was able to beat opposing corners off the line in school. Can be a little bit passive in 50-50 situations, letting the ball come to him instead of working back and using his body to shield defenders from the ball. Seemed to have some chemistry issues with his quarterback when targeted downfield this past season.

Summary: 

  • Volume receiver who has a pretty good set of physical and athletic tools and few if any major weaknesses in his game; not the biggest, fastest, or strongest receiver, but runs good routes, has plus body control and flexibility, and is a reliable target who has the burst to rack up yards after the catch. Doesn’t quite have a full route tree at this point, running a lot of screens, slants, curls, and go routes, and may have to diversify into the intermediate routes more to stay on the outside.

WR DaeSean Hamilton, Penn St.

6’1” – 205 lbs. – 4.52

Profile: 

  • Redshirted, then immediately had a major impact for the Nittany Lions, enjoying his most productive season as a redshirt freshman and putting up decent numbers in the three subsequent seasons as well. Despite being a relatively tall, well-built wide receiver, did most of his work out of the slot in college. Ran routes to all three levels of the field, but most of his production is at the short-to-intermediate level on digs, curls, drags, tunnel screens, and other patterns designed to get him the ball with some room to work. Best when he’s making an inside release from the slot, carrying defenders on his outside shoulder, and then breaking patterns over the middle.

 Positives: 

  • Has pretty good footwork to release at the line of scrimmage against press coverage. Runs a lot of patterns which take him over the middle of the field and does a good job of creating separation at the route stem. Technician who runs routes with nuance and can sink his hips and use head fakes to get open. Aware of where he is on the field and able to settle into soft spots underneath the defense. Has very reliable hands. Able to catch the ball away from his frame and hold onto passes through contact. Not a particularly dynamic runner after the catch but is willing to get physical and doesn’t waste time before getting upfield. Gives good effort to stick with his opponents when stalking in the run game.

 Negatives: 

  • Not a particularly fast or explosive receiver; relies on technique to separate and produce. May lack the speed to stretch defenses on the outside, but was given a lot of opportunities to win on 50-50 balls downfield from the slot, often with outside releases that took him toward the boundary. Is able to track and adjust to downfield throws, with good body control to come down with catches. Runs some good wheel routes from the slot, and was often targeted on those sorts of throws when working in the red zone. Able to use his body to shield defenders from the ball, although he could be more aggressive about working back to throws when targeted.

Summary: 

  • A polished, reliable slot target whose speed was a question going into the pre-draft process, but who ran well at his pro day and consequently stands a pretty good shot of coming off the board on the second day. As one of the most pro-ready receivers in this year’s class, stands a good chance of being able to win a slot job sooner rather than later, although his lack of snaps on the outside raises the question of whether or not he’ll be able to do that at the next level.