DT DAQUAN JONES, PENN ST.

daquanjones

6’3” – 318 lbs. – 5.25e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2010: 6 – 2.0 – 1.0
2011: 8 – 0.0 – 0.0, 1 QBH
2012: 22 – 2.0 – 0.5, 1 PD

OVERVIEW:

Was used sparingly during his freshman and sophomore seasons, but eventually worked his way into the starting lineup as a junior in 2011, starting Penn State’s first eleven games, a role he has reprised as a senior.

STRENGTHS:

•    Overall build is highly impressive for a 4-3 nose tackle prospect.
•    Has an outstanding ability to shed blocks due to active hand use.
•    Scheme-versatile; could be a 4-3 nose tackle or 3-4 five-technique.
•    Strength allows him to re-establish a more favorable line of scrimmage.
•    Despite his size, gets low enough to win the leverage battle inside.
•    Uses a variety of different moves to confuse opposing offensive linemen.
•    Awareness and instincts prevent him from getting out of position.
•    More of a downhill player but also possesses an above-average anchor.
•    Consistently disruptive as a senior after underperforming previously.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Initial burst is only average and doesn’t necessarily explode off the line.
•    Has only been a productive player for one season and a starter for two.
•    Doesn’t have too much experience with two-gap responsibilities.
•    Height is slightly below-average for a five-technique defensive end.
•    Previously missed some time in his collegiate career due to injuries.
•    Was not productive over the course of his first three collegiate seasons.

SUMMARY:

Jones is an underrated prospect at this point in the evaluation process because of his underwhelming freshman-through-junior seasons, in which he struggled to distinguish himself. However, as a senior Jones has been borderline unblockable, with outstanding hand-usage, creativity, and power, establishing himself as one of the most disruptive interior linemen in the country. May not be quite as safe as former Nittany Lion Jared Odrick, but nonetheless projects as a starting-caliber defensive lineman. RD 1-2

OG ANTHONY STEEN, ALABAMA

anthonysteen

6’3” – 309 lbs. – 5.25e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2009: Redshirt
2010: 13 GP / 2 GS (RG)
2011: 13 GP / 9 GS (RG)
2012: 14 GP / 14 GS (RG)

OVERVIEW:

Redshirted in 2009, then started two games at right guard as a sophomore in 2010 following Barrett Jones’ high-ankle sprain. Assumed a more traditional role as a redshirt sophomore in 2010 by starting nine games that season, beginning with a streak of seven straight starts which was interrupted by an injury. As a junior, started all fourteen games for the team at right guard, a role he has maintained since.

STRENGTHS:

•    Will graduate with roughly three years of quality starting experience.
•    Well-coached, consistent, and assignment-sound; rarely makes mistakes.
•    Possesses adequate size and bulk for a professional offensive guard.
•    Effective pass protector who demonstrates sound awareness in that area.
•    Capable of redirecting blockers in the run game to clear holes for backs.
•    Has a strong anchor and can easily handle an opponent’s initial punch.
•    Does a good job of sustaining his blocks in both facets of the game.
•    Will take the opportunity to attack an opponent’s shoulder if possible.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Overall physical and athletic tools are only average for the position.
•    Arm length looks to be a little bit shorter than usual for a top guard.
•    Has played with an outstanding supporting cast of star linemen.
•    Only collegiate position has been right guard; also lacks pro versatility.
•    Struggles when asked to get to the second level and secure blocks.
•    Much more of a wall-off blocker rather than a dominant finisher.
•    Not among the most impressive prospects in terms of hand use.
•    Probably limited to inline blocking schemes at the next level.

SUMMARY:

A reliable, experienced three-year SEC starter, there are no major flaws in Steen’s game, but his overall build and athleticism are only average for the position. Not a blocker with a visible killer instinct, he projects as a potential pro starter. Some work in terms of hand use is still necessary. Has been overshadowed by teammates but is a highly-competent inline option. RD 3

DE SCOTT CRICHTON, OREGON ST.*

scottcrichton

6’3” – 265 lbs. – 4.75e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2010: Redshirt
2011: 74 – 14.5 – 6.0, 6 FF, 3 PD, 1 K/PB
2012: 44 – 17.5 – 9.0, 1 QBH, 1 FF, 3 PD, 1 K/PB

OVERVIEW:

Redshirted in 2010 before taking over as a starter in 2011, recording an impressive 74-14.5-6.0 line with six forced fumbles and being named an Honorable Mention All-Conference selection. In his second year as a starter, Crichton recorded 44-17.5-9.0 and was named to the All-Pac 12 First Team by conference coaches. Underwent offseason shoulder surgery but has started 30 games thus far in his career.

STRENGTHS:

•    Highly productive player with three years of starting experience.
•    Has a prototypical frame for a pass rusher, either in a 4-3 or 3-4.
•    Active hand use and strength allow him to shed blockers effectively.
•    Has rushed from both sides of the defensive line with the Beavers.
•    High-motor player against both the run and the pass, impressive range.
•    Gets off the line of scrimmage quickly and can win the outside edge.
•    Anchor is powerful enough to hold up when teams rush at him.
•    Will go for the strip when given the opportunity to do so.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Tends to play a little bit upright, sacrificing some of his natural power.
•    Probably doesn’t have ideal movement skills for a 3-4 outside linebacker.
•    Needs to develop additional rush moves, as favors bull-rush too heavily.
•    Feet stop churning at times, preventing him from reestablishing LOS.
•    Loses track of the ball at times, does not always see plays developing.
•    Needs to be more patient in backside contain, susceptible to cutbacks.

SUMMARY:

Crichton’s measurable and pedigree are impressive enough to warrant early-round attention, but he must improve his pad level and footwork and develop additional rush moves to reach his potential. Nonetheless, despite his lack of ideal athletic ability he is already a fairly dangerous, high-motor pass rusher who should be able to interest teams running both three-and-four-man fronts, with 4-3 left end projecting as his best fit at the pro level. RD 2-3

IB ANDREW JACKSON, WESTERN KENTUCKY

andrewjackson

6’1” – 257 – 4.80e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2010: N/A
2011: 109 – 17.0 – 3.5, 1 FF, 1 FR, 1 PD, 1 INT
2012: 122 – 17.5 – 2.0 – 4 FF, 1 PD

OVERVIEW:

Appeared in just one game as a freshman before assuming the starting middle linebacker role as a sophomore, being named to the All-Sun Belt First Team based on his team-leading figures in both tackles and tackles for loss. He led the team in tackles again as a junior, being named to the All-Sun Belt First Team once again.

STRENGTHS:

•    Will enter the draft with three productive years of starting experience.
•    Very thickly-built player who would comfortably translate to a 3-4.
•    Quick to recognize plays and frequently gets to the hole before the back.
•    Powerful hitter and tackler who can drive ballcarriers back on contact.
•    Can shed blocks well due to overall strength and active hand use.
•    Has a little bit more speed than anticipated, augmenting recognition.
•    Capable of getting pressure on quarterbacks as a blitzing option.
•    Has a non-stop motor which keeps him in plenty of plays.
•    Held his own against major collegiate programs such as Alabama.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Height is a little bit less than ideal and may be listed slightly high.
•    Production is inflated from having played against Sun Belt competition.
•    Plays faster than expected but still lacks ideal athleticism for the position.
•    Lacks the speed to chase down runners from behind in pursuit.
•    Probably not the best option for a coverage-based defensive scheme.
•    Can do a little bit of zone coverage but could be exploited against backs.
•    A strict middle/inside ‘backer for most schemes, possible 3-4 “elephant.”

SUMMARY:

Despite having played for a small-school program, Jackson is one of the most pro-ready inside linebackers in the draft, with a thick, powerful build, effective recognition skills and pursuit angles, and sound tackling skills. He’s best suited for a SILB role in a three-man front but could play MLB in a 4-3 as well if necessary. His play versus talented programs should help allay concerns about having played for Western Kentucky. RD 2-3

IB A.J. JOHNSON, TENNESSEE*

ajjohnson

6’2” – 243 lbs. – 4.80e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2011: 80 – 4.5 – 0.0, 1 FF, 2 FR
2012: 138 – 8.5 – 1.0 – 8 QBH – 1 FR, 1 PD (12-21-6 rushing)

OVERVIEW:

Started ten games at middle linebacker as a true freshman, appearing in twelve contests and finishing second on the team in tackles en route to being named an SEC All-Freshman Team selection. In 2012, he started all twelve games for the team, leading his team and conference in tackles and being named to the All-SEC Second Team by conference coaches; also rushed the ball out of Tennessee’s wildcat formation for six touchdowns. Was named to the Preseason All-SEC First Team by conference coaches prior to this year.

STRENGTHS:

•    Has plenty of experience, having been a three-year SEC starter.
•    Adequate size and bulk for a middle linebacker in a four-man front.
•    Frame is thick enough to potentially shift to a three-man front.
•    Plays with a low center of gravity and takes on blockers well for size.
•    Fights through trash well and can scrape down the line versus the run.
•    Powerful hitter who acts as an intimidating presence in the defense.
•    Plays with a high motor and will pursue plays farther than anticipated.
•    Overall recognition skills help mask some of his athletic deficiencies.
•    Can create pressure as an interior blitzer despite just one career sack.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Would need to add additional bulk in order to play in a 3-4 defense.
•    Not fast enough to recover easily when caught out of position.
•    Change-of-direction and lateral agility could become problems.
•    Occasionally gets lost in zone coverage, could be exploited in pros.
•    Lacks the speed to cover running backs and tight ends in man coverage.
•    May not be particularly well-suited to the modern makeup of the NFL.
•    Requires some projection schematically, as skills better suit 3-4 defense.

SUMMARY:

Productive, physical linebacker who plays like he belongs in a three-man front but whose college play has been as a 4-3 middle linebacker. Will likely have to bulk up and make the transition due to athletic limitations. RD 4-5

TE AUSTIN SEFERIAN-JENKINS, WASHINGTON*

6’6” – 276 lbs. – 4.80e

STATISTICAL PROFILE:

2011: 41 – 537 – 6 (13.1)
2012: 69 – 852 – 7 (12.4)

OVERVIEW:

Started ten games as a true freshman in 2011, playing in every contest and earning an honorable mention All-Pac-12 selection in the process. Production escalated as a sophomore, being named to the All-Pac-12 Second Team and being named one of three finalists for the John Mackey Award. In March, was arrested for DUI after crashing his car with a 0.18 blood alcohol level.

STRENGTHS:

•    Highly productive three-year starter at a major collegiate program.
•    Massive tight end prospect with outstanding height, bulk, and length.
•    Lines up all over the formation; inline, H-Back, slot, fullback, wide.
•    Very soft hands; rarely squanders an opportunity to make a catch.
•    Can maintain possession of the ball in traffic or while taking a hit.
•    Catch radius is very impressive, makes plenty of acrobatic grabs.
•    Uses his frame well to shield defenders from the ball on passing plays.
•    Gets pretty good arm extension as a run blocker, fairly active feet.
•    Has the anchor to handle power rushes when retained in pass protection.
•    Coordinated player despite having an oversized build for the position.
•    Size and bulk should make him a dangerous option in the red zone.
•    Well-spoken, mature player who could assuage concerns about DUI.

WEAKNESSES:

•    Certainly not one of the fastest or most explosive options in his class.
•    May have some trouble separating from defenders at the next level.
•    Versatility may be reined in a bit at the NFL level versus better athletes.
•    Doesn’t necessarily get a ton of push in the run game despite his size.
•    Consistently beat to the edge in pass protection versus speed rushers.
•    Blocking technique needs plenty of work: falls off man, bends at waist.
•    Was arrested for driving under the influence; will require investigation.

SUMMARY:

Seferian-Jenkins isn’t one of the most explosive tight end prospects in recent memory, but should easily find a place in the second round thanks to his size, hands, and body control. His blocking skills need significant refinement, but he possesses the physical tools to improve markedly in that regard. RD 2