QB Justin Fields, Ohio St.

QB Justin Fields, Ohio St.* (6’3”, 228)

Background:

Five-star recruit who originally committed to Penn St. but ended up attending Georgia, where he backed up Jake Fromm in 2018, totaling nearly six hundred yards before transferring to Ohio St. Earned a waiver granting him immediate eligibility for Ohio St. after filing a lawsuit against the NCAA. Took over as the Buckeyes’ starter and went 13-1 in his first season, taking the team to the semifinals after passing for 3,273 yards (67.2%, 9.2 YPA), 41 touchdowns, and three interceptions and rushing 137 times for 484 yards and 10 scores. Followed that up by going 7-1 the following year, taking the team to the National Championship, and passing for 2,100 yards (70.2%, 9.3 YPA), 22 touchdowns, and 6 interceptions, while posting a rushing line of 81-383-5 (4.7).

Positives:

Highly productive, winning quarterback over two years as a starter. Well-built player with solid height for the position, assuming his listed height matches his measurements during the pre-draft process. Has some experience taking snaps from under center. Very athletic player with a pass-first mentality. Gets the ball out quickly when his primary option is open. Nice over-the-top delivery, and can drop his arm angle at times. Has very solid arm talent; capable of making all the throws, pushing the ball down the field with good velocity and a tight spiral. Gets good velocity even when throwing off of his back foot. Overall ball placement is good, throwing a catchable ball. Shows the ability to manipulate safeties with his eyes. Powerful build and athleticism allow him to escape pressure and extend the play. Nice pirouette to escape pressure. Can capitalize on opportunities to scramble up the middle for first downs. Keeps his eyes downfield when fleeing the pocket. Often makes something out of nothing when his protection breaks down.

Negatives:

Production consisted of a lot of easy throws to open primary targets; will have to make a pretty big adjustment to the pro level. Has a tendency to bird-dog targets, many of his throws having been to primary reads. When his primary read is covered, struggles to get the ball out on time. Tends to have a checkdown but rarely scans from right to left or vice versa. Can rely too much on his arm at times, not transferring his weight and occasionally throwing with his body open. Gets a lot of passes batted at the line. Sometimes doesn’t know when to give up on a play.

Summary:

A quarterback with impressive toughness, arm talent, and accuracy, and who has the mobility to escape from pressure and convert the occasional first down. However, the team who drafts him will have to use their imagination, because a lot of the time he was executing an offense which was based around predetermined reads and kept things relatively simple for the quarterback. More mobile and with more accuracy on his deep ball than former Buckeye and first-round pick Dwayne Haskins, he will likely come off the board within the top ten picks or so, but sometimes it feels like he’s just executing a well-designed offense.

OT Jalen Mayfield, Michigan

OT Jalen Mayfield, Michigan* (6’5”, 320)

Background:

Originally committed to Minnesota before changing his commitment. Appeared in three games at left tackle as a true freshman, then took over the starting right tackle position the following year, a role he reprised in 2020 before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Has adequate height and excellent bulk, which translates into very good functional strength. A technically-sound player who bends at the knees, gets into his seat, and generally engages from a solid base. Technique in his pass sets looks good, keeping his hands high and tight and getting enough depth in his kickslide to protect the edge. Was generally able to protect the edge without abandoning his form. Work rate in the run game is good. Doesn’t have outstanding athleticism but is able to successfully secure blocks in space or climb to the second level within a limited radius. Capable of chipping one opponent and getting up to the second level. Gets good extension with his arms when engaging. Understands positioning and can leverage his reasonable short-area quickness and anchor to wall off opponents. Does a good job of sticking with opponents through the whistle, with what looks like pretty solid grip strength. Comes with two years of starting experience at a major program and under a respected coaching staff.

Negatives:

Might be limited to playing on the right or on the inside, probably in an inline blocking scheme. Would like to see him keep his hands inside a little bit more consistently. Not quite the brick wall his bulk would suggest. Can occasionally get a little bit upright and struggle with the initial contact, although he tends to recover. Can be ragdolled a little bit when opponents get into his pads. Range as a blocker is somewhat limited by his lack of ideal athleticism. Can occasionally let his aggressiveness cause him to overextend and play outside of his frame a little bit. More of a wall-off blocker than a true mauler. Feet can sometimes go dead on contact, contenting himself with winning the positioning battle instead of driving opponents off the spot.

Summary:

A solid all-around right tackle who has the bulk, anchor, technique, and short-area quickness to function effectively as a wall-off blocker in the run game and to protect the edge on passing downs. Although he is perhaps more workmanlike than aggressive and appears to lack ideal flexibility and agility, he is a consistent executor on a snap-to-snap basis, offering teams the peace-of-mind that comes with knowing what they’re getting. Looks like a nice meat-and-potatoes building block for an inline scheme.

OT Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame

OT Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame (6’6”, 302)

Background:

Highly-regarded recruit who began his collegiate career behind Mike McGlinchey, redshirting in 2016 and appearing in five games in 2017 before stepping into the starting role at left tackle the following year. Has reprised that role in each of the past two seasons.

Positives:

Comes three years of starting experience at a program renowned for churning out high-quality offensive line prospects. Offers solid size and length for a pro offensive tackle. Was a pretty consistent snap-to-snap pass protector over the past three seasons. Mirrors effectively while maintaining form. Gets solid depth in his kickslide to protect the edge from speed, but is also capable of pivoting back in to protect against inside moves. Able to bend his knees a little and plays from a wide base in pass protection. Fires out with both hands and gets good extension to keep defenders out of his body; overall accuracy is a plus, even when resetting. Keeps his head up and generally keeps his back straight through contact. Anchor is surprisingly solid for a player listed at just over 300 pounds. Shows a solid work rate in the run game, with good leg drive after contact. Has a pretty powerful shove and the aggressiveness to go for the kill when he has a chance. Short area quickness is adequate to climb to the second level and engage successfully. Understands positioning and can use his quickness to seal the edge effectively.

Negatives:

Played almost exclusively out of a two-point stance. Listed weight is a little bit on the low side but doesn’t carry his weight particularly well. Foot speed and lateral quickness are at least adequate but kickslide can look a little bit stilted at times. At times turns into a little bit of a leaner who can fall off of blocks when opponents go to their counter. Can struggle against spin moves in pass protection. More of a shover than someone who consistently drives opponents of of their spot in the run game. Can get overly aggressive and end up bending at the waist, causing him to fall off of blocks or end up on the ground. Ability to sustain in the run game is just average.

Summary:

Doesn’t have elite athleticism or power, but his height, length, lateral quickness, and technique made him a very solid blindside protector in the passing game at the college level, and could allow him to stay on the blindside in the pros as well. More of a high-effort player than a phone-booth mauler in the run game, but could potentially play in either a zone or power blocking scheme.

OC Creed Humphrey, Oklahoma

OC Creed Humphrey, Oklahoma* (6’5”, 320)

Background:

Four-star recruit who redshirted in 2017, then stepped into the starting role for twelve games the following year. Reprised that role in both 2019 and 2020, then declared for the draft.

Positives:

Comes with three years of starting experience for a major program. Has ideal size for a pro interior lineman. Very consistent anchor on a snap-to-snap basis, a function of size, technique, and balance. Plays from a wide, very stable base, keeping his back straight and locking out opponents with his arms; very hard to overwhelm with power approaches. Proactive about firing his hands out and getting extension, with accurate placement. Understands positioning and has the short-area quickness to get between defenders and the ballcarrier. Has enough grip and upper-body strength to generate torque after locking on. Does a good job of sustaining once he’s locked on; handles technicians well, easily capable of sticking with opponents through counters. Bulk is such that he is capable of disrupting defenders even when he doesn’t have ideal positioning; capable of winning ugly if needed. Works well with teammates to double-team opponents in the run game. Could theoretically be considered for another position on the line if desired.

Negatives:

Would like to see him fire out lower and with more aggression. Not always the most active with his feet once engaging; can be content to lock on and wall off instead of driving opponents off the ball. Can have some difficulty diagnosing and picking up blitzes. Could be a little bit more active about scanning when he doesn’t have an immediate assignment. More comfortable absorbing power than he is handling quick gap-shooting types; lateral quickness is just adequate, and doesn’t always maintain ideal positioning when mirroring. Wasn’t really asked to cover too much ground and may be considered more of an inline prospect by ssome teams. Can occasionally lapse into observing before the whistle.

Summary:

Is one of the most experienced, consistent, and technically-sound options in a draft class full of big, high-quality interior offensive linemen. May not appeal so much to teams looking for quicker, more mobile options, but even given the depth in the class at the center and guard positions, it would come as a surprise if he didn’t come off the board by the end of the second round or so, given his pro-ready game and size.

OT Samuel Cosmi, Texas

OT Samuel Cosmi, Texas* (6’7”, 309)

Background:

Redshirted, then started thirteen games at right tackle the following year, flipping to the blindside the following season. Finished his junior season early after eight games to prepare for the draft.

Positives:

Tall and carries his weight well. Light on his feet with good lateral quickness and smooth movement skills. Does a good job of bending at the knees and getting depth in his kickslide to protect the edge; rarely gets beaten by pure speed rushers. Texas felt confident enough in his ability to frequently leave him on an island against opposing primary pass-rushers. Keeps his back straight and his head up into contact, playing within his frame. Able to place and reset his hands effectively to stay engaged versus counters. Chippy with a powerful shove to knock opponents off-balance but needs to be more consistent about using it. Would fit a zone-blocking scheme well. Work rate is consistent on a snap-to-snap basis. Capable of blocking down in the outside shoulder and sealing. Can chip one defender at the line and climb to the second level to successfully engage linebackers. Keeps his feet churning after contact in the run game and works to sustain through the whistle. Recovers well and can get the upper hand to wash defenders down the line even when losing the initial engagement. Shows a killer instinct to finish when he’s in position.

Negatives:

Will need to adjust to playing out of three-point stances. As a taller lineman, plays a little bit high at times. Can lapse into absorbing bull-rushers instead of firing out with his hands to be the aggressor. Drops his anchor a little bit late and can be pushed back into the pocket. Consequently, may need to develop more functional strength and could potentially be limited to playing left tackle despite some experience on the right. Would like to see him get more consistent extension with his arms to lock out defenders. Can occasionally be caught throwing a shoulder at an opponent instead of engaging with his hands. Looks better getting depth against the speed rush than he does pivoting back to stop inside moves. A little bit on the tall side and doesn’t always get the best of it at the beginning of a snap.

Summary:

A tall, athletic left tackle who is very temperamentally-suited to playing on the line, can defend against speed, and can reach assignments in space in the run game, but who still has to add some functional strength and get more aggressive with his punch. The value of his position could potentially earn him a spot in the first round of the draft, likely on a team which prefers more athletic zone-blocking linemen. There’s some risk here, but no inherent limitations on his ceiling.

OL Rashawn Slater, Northwestern

OL Rashawn Slater, Northwestern (6’4”, 315)

Background:

Started twelve games at right tackle as a true freshman, then slid over to left tackle and started a total of twenty-five games there over the following two years. However, decided to opt out of the 2020 season due to Covid-19, leaving him as a three-year starter.

Positives:

Has a very study, powerful build. A consistent player on a snap-to-snap basis. Should be able to play in any type of blocking scheme. Has pretty good short-area quickness to cross an opponent’s face and wall them off from the play direction. Able to climb up to the second level and successfully engage. Places his hands up and inside and shows the ability to lock on and sustain through the whistle. Demosntrates good leg drive after engaging. Was able to maintain his form when protecting the edge. Plays from his seat with a solid base and good arm extension. Anchors well against power with good balance. Proactive with his hands; fires out his punch to keep defenders out of his body. Was asked to jog into position on some rollouts to the opposite side and was able to set up in time. Able to chip one opponent and recover to block another. Was able to hold his own against high-quality collegiate pass-rushers in a major conference, if not at a major program

Negatives:

Looks like a possible candidate to be asked to slide inside to guard, especially if he measures in at less than his listed height of 6’4”. Has below-average length and can occasionally let defenders into his body, getting jolted on initial contact. More physical than he is a mauler in a phone booth. Success blocking in space at the college level was due more to effort and timing than outstanding athleticism. Was flagged for one holding penalty during the games reviewed (Ohio St.) Tended to play out of a two-point stance so will have some adjustment to make if he’s asked to move inside at the next level.

Summary:

A very good football player who comes with three years and starting experience, and it shows. Plays under control, replicates his form in pass sets, and has a combination of balance, short-area quickness, and grip strength which makes him look like a plug-and-play starter along a pro offensive line, whether at offensive tackle or guard.

OT Penei Sewell, Oregon

OT Penei Sewell, Oregon* (6’6”, 330)

Background:

Started seven games as a true freshman, missing six games due to injury but returning to man the left tackle position in time for the team’s bowl game. Won the Outland Trophy the following year, then opted out of the 2020 season before declaring for the draft. Has pro bloodlines: uncles are former defensive lineman Isaac Sopoaga and former linebacker Richard Brown, and also has three brothers playing at the college level.

Positives:

Has solid height/length and excellent bulk for a pro offensive lineman, appearing to carry his weight well. Temperament and work rate are both pluses: plays the game with urgency and aggression, working hard to engage and sustain through the whistle. Exhibits the killer instinct to finish snaps with pancakes when given the opportunity. Has the athleticism to play in space in a zone-based scheme. Capable of chipping one opponent and recovering to block another. Can block on angles, climb to the second level and successfully engage, or lead the way in space. Good leg drive after engaging; can consistently overwhelm second-level defenders. Was often asked to work on an island in the passing game. Quick and light on his feet, with impressive lateral quickness. Generates good torque with his upper body to twist defenders to the ground when he gets a grip. Looks great leading the way in the screen game. Has the short-area quickness to pull and set up on the blindside when the quarterback rolls out to the right.

Negatives:

Basically has just a year and a half of starting experience under his belt due to injury and having opted out. Typically played out of a two-point stance and will have to get used to putting his hand in the dirt more often. Didn’t put a ton of snaps under his belt in which he’s getting depth in his kickslide and doesn’t always look like he has a sound base under him, forcing him to rely on his natural strength. Can lapse into being more of a shover and occasionally falling off of blocks by getting overly aggressive. Can be jolted by opponents when he lets them into his body; would like to see more consistent extension. Generally handles both speed and power well but can struggle to reset his hands when working against technicians.

Summary:

Despite his lack of extensive starting experience, his rare combination of size, athleticism, and aggressiveness looks like it’ll make him a high first-round pick. Could theoretically play in either a zone or inline blocking scheme, although the former might make better use of his lateral quickness and ability to work in space. Will not turn 21 until October, so whoever drafts him could be adding a long-term cornerstone to their offensive line at its most valuable position.

OT Christian Darrisaw, Virginia Tech

LT Christian Darrisaw, Virginia Tech* (6’5”, 314)

Background:

Originally attended Fork Union Military Academy. At Virginia Tech, became a starter in his first year (2018), and retained that role for the two subsequent seasons before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Listed as and predominantly plays left tackle but would be moved around a little bit; can be seen working as a sixth offensive lineman on the opposite side at times. Has a wide body which can make up for his average height. Overall work rate is good. Surprisingly fast in a straight line, which allows him to get out in space and lead the way in the run game. Capable of pulling to the right side of the line to thump defenders in backside pursuit. Able to work on angles. Knows when to slow down in order to line up an opposing linebacker and is capable of successfully engaging. Has enough short area quickness to get outside positioning and wall off in the run game. Overall grip strength is very good, and plays from a stable base, allowing him to lock on and eliminate opponents from the play. Very hard to lse with counter-moves. Blocks down to seal defenders inside very well. Has an excellent anchor which may represent his greatest strength as a player; does a good job of keeping his back straight and holding the point of attack, and is capable of winning snaps when in less-than-ideal position. Powerful shove to knock defenders off-balance. Overpowers second-level defenders with ease.

Negatives:

Height is on the low end for an offensive tackle and, given his thick build, could theoretically be viewed as a conversion candidate; in any event, doesn’t seem particularly likely to stick on the blindside. Doesn’t appear to carry his weight particularly well. Capable of succeeding in space because of his speed and effort, but doesn’t have the smoothest movement skills. Powerful and hard-working but doesn’t always show a killer instinct. Team didn’t leave him on an island on passing downs as much as some of the other top prospects in the class. Can get caught peeking into the backfield before the whistle. Struggles to recover positioning when he sets up too far inside or outside, forcing him to rely on his anchor.

Summary:

Depending on how teams feel about his height/length, may ultimately end up being asked to slide inside to guard, but combines a thick build, an outstanding anchor, and surprising versatility in the run game, all traits which could well make him a solid starter at the pro level. Not just limited to an inline scheme because of his effort and ability to execute blocks in space.

OL Alijah Vera-Tucker, Southern California

OL Alijah Vera-Tucker, Southern California* (6’4”, 315)

Background:

High-school offensive tackle who redshirted, then appeared in a reserve role the following season before taking over the starting left guard position in 2019. Slid out to left tackle for his junior year, then declared for the draft.

Positives:

Has played both guard and tackle for the Trojans. Very thickly-built offensive lineman with excellent bulk for either the inside or the outside; looks like he was able to slim down for tackle in 2020. Snap-to-snap output is consistent. Pass sets look good, bending his knees and keeping his hands high and his back straight. Plays from a seat and within his frame. Pretty light on his feet to mirror adequately against gap-shooters while maintaining form/balance. Gets good extension with his arms and is active with his hands to lock defenders out of his body; placement overall is good and is capable of resetting his hands accurately. Anchors easily against power in pass protection. Keeps his head on a swivel and seeks out opponents to block when not lined up opposite an opponent. Wins on rushing downs because he understands positioning and can use his size to wall off defenders. Capable of pulling to the right side of the formation and delivering crack blocks on backside pursuers. Some ability to block down and then climb. Demonstrates solid leg drive and works hard to stick with assignments through the whistle.

Negatives:

Build is probably more suitable for the interior of the offensive line; will need to confirm that he’s 6’4” and post impressive arm measurements to be considered as a tackle candidate. Overall range and athleticism are somewhat limited; more of a phone-booth blocker who struggles to consistently reach opponents in space, and has a hard time sticking with them when the play is flowing horizontally. Lacks recovery speed. Can occasionally lower his head when firing out of his stance in the run game, making him susceptible to swim moves. Hands can get grabby when dealing with quick opponents. Work rate is good but is not the nastiest or most aggressive blocker.

Summary:

Converted to tackle this past season and rose to the occasion but would probably fit best as an interior lineman. Not a pure mauler or a great athlete, but plays with technique and consistency and has the bulk and lower-body strength to anchor in pass protection and execute assignments on rushing downs provided he’s not asked to cover too much ground. A relatively safe draft pick, he should hear his name called within the first two rounds.

LB Zaven Collins, Tulsa

LB Zaven Collins, Tulsa* (6’4”, 260)

Background:

Has been a major contributor since his redshirt freshman year, a season in which he posted a line of 85-9.5-1.5 with an interception and a forced fumble. Followed that up with 97-8.0-2.0 as a sophomore, and in just eight games this past season, posted a line of 54-7.5-4.0 with four interceptions and four forced fumbles, as well as two defensive touchdowns. Won the Nagurski and Bednarik awards this past season, being considered college football’s best defensive player.

Positives:

Typically lines up on the weakside as an off-ball linebacker. Combines a conservative approach with high-end athleticism. Very instinctive player who does a great job of reading keys and taking efficient angles to the ball. Has excellent range, especially for his size; a true sideline-to-sideline player. Generally does a good job of breaking down to avoid coming in too fast and blowing by runners. Closing burst is very impressive when working from the backside. Length gives him an impressive tackling radius. Has good speed and impressive hips when dropping into zones. Plays light on his feet and anticipates passing lanes well, using his length to bat down throws. Sniffs out screens and makes his way to the sidelines. Physical profile could allow him to match up against tight ends and carry backs into the flats or down the field. Can anticipate snap counts and get penetration as a blitzer. Not just a gap-shooter at the snap; also flashes the ability to dip his shoulder or use his hands to work past blockers as an edge rusher.

Negatives:

Not the most physical player when working through trash, especially given his size; played behind a lot of three-man lines at the college level, but looks best when he’s flowing laterally. Would like to see him show more of a sense of urgency to shed in those situations. Wasn’t asked to work in man-to-man coverage very often, although he has the tools to do so. Could stand to clean up his footwork a little bit when making spot drops.

Summary:

An intelligent, rangy, and versatile linebacker who comes with three years of high-level production and who is well-suited to an every-down role at the next level, being capable of reading keys and flowing sideline-to-sideline in the running game and blitzing or dropping into zone coverage in the passing game, demonstrating the ability to read a quarterback’s eyes, flip his hips, and disrupt passing lanes. Looks like a first-round pick and future starter.