OT Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame (6’6”, 302)

Background:

Highly-regarded recruit who began his collegiate career behind Mike McGlinchey, redshirting in 2016 and appearing in five games in 2017 before stepping into the starting role at left tackle the following year. Has reprised that role in each of the past two seasons.

Positives:

Comes three years of starting experience at a program renowned for churning out high-quality offensive line prospects. Offers solid size and length for a pro offensive tackle. Was a pretty consistent snap-to-snap pass protector over the past three seasons. Mirrors effectively while maintaining form. Gets solid depth in his kickslide to protect the edge from speed, but is also capable of pivoting back in to protect against inside moves. Able to bend his knees a little and plays from a wide base in pass protection. Fires out with both hands and gets good extension to keep defenders out of his body; overall accuracy is a plus, even when resetting. Keeps his head up and generally keeps his back straight through contact. Anchor is surprisingly solid for a player listed at just over 300 pounds. Shows a solid work rate in the run game, with good leg drive after contact. Has a pretty powerful shove and the aggressiveness to go for the kill when he has a chance. Short area quickness is adequate to climb to the second level and engage successfully. Understands positioning and can use his quickness to seal the edge effectively.

Negatives:

Played almost exclusively out of a two-point stance. Listed weight is a little bit on the low side but doesn’t carry his weight particularly well. Foot speed and lateral quickness are at least adequate but kickslide can look a little bit stilted at times. At times turns into a little bit of a leaner who can fall off of blocks when opponents go to their counter. Can struggle against spin moves in pass protection. More of a shover than someone who consistently drives opponents of of their spot in the run game. Can get overly aggressive and end up bending at the waist, causing him to fall off of blocks or end up on the ground. Ability to sustain in the run game is just average.

Summary:

Doesn’t have elite athleticism or power, but his height, length, lateral quickness, and technique made him a very solid blindside protector in the passing game at the college level, and could allow him to stay on the blindside in the pros as well. More of a high-effort player than a phone-booth mauler in the run game, but could potentially play in either a zone or power blocking scheme.

RB Javonte Williams, North Carolina* (5’10”, 220)

Background:

Carried the ball 43 times as a freshman, picking up 224 yards and five touchdowns (5.2) before stepping into a major role the following year, a season in which he put together a line of 166-933-5 (5.6), adding seventeen catches as well. Touches were almost exactly the same as a junior, but his efficiency improved dramatically, rushing 157 times for 1,140 yards and 19 touchdowns (7.3) and adding 25-305-3 (12.2) receiving before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Made a substantial leap in efficiency this past season. Very well-built running back who looks the part of a primary ballcarrier at the pro level; has a very strong, thick lower body. Muscular frame carries over into his style of play; sort of a throwback power-runner who can wear down defenses. Contact balance is very impressive; able to shrug off glancing blows and stay upright through hitters who don’t wrap. Almost never brought down by the first player who has a shot at him. Easily runs through smaller defenders at the second level, with a tough, physical style of play. Tends to fall forward at the end of runs. Navigates through congestion well; able to find a crease, squeeze through tight spaces, and pick up solid gains. Good vision to improvise and make something out of nothing when the play direction is clogged, recognizing cutback lanes and redirecting quickly. Shows consistent ball security technique, consistently switching hands to carry toward the sideline. Very effective around the goal line. Could make an impact sooner than some of the other top backs because he’s already comfortable in blitz pickup. Alert player who shuffles into the appropriate position and engages from his seat with his arms extended, showing plus contact balance to absorb opponents.

Negatives:

Predominantly carried the ball out of shotgun formations. Has a tendency to run a little bit higher than you’d like between the tackles. More of a chunk runner than a home-run hitter in terms of his top-end speed. Wasn’t used as a receiver too often, and his overall usage was limited to swing routes and the occasional improvisation.

Summary:

Might be the most physical, powerful runner in this year’s class, combining a tough, gritty approach with outstanding contact balance; it’s fun to watch opponents bouncing off of him, and works in a stiff-arm powerful enough to make any old-school football fan smile. May not be quite as fast or explosive as some of the other top backs, nor as versatile a receiving option, but he should be able to come in and carry the load early in his pro career, something which should have him off the board somewhere in the second round or so.

OG Wyatt Davis, Ohio St.* (6’4”, 315)

Background:

Grandfather is Hall of Fame defensive end Willie Davis. Five-star recruit who redshirted, then started the final two games of the following season. Took over as a starter in 2019 and reprised that role this past season.

Positives:

Very thickly-built offensive guard who carries his weight well. Plays the game with nastiness, attempting to dominate opponents. Phone-booth mauler who can win on initial contact and showcases good leg drive and impressive functional strength to drive defenders off the spot and finish. Has lots of power in his hands and the upper-body strength to generate torque and twist opponents to the ground. Works hard through the whistle, and when asked to get out in space and engage; has some ability to reach linebackers when working in a straight line. Can pull a little bit and crack opponents at the line of scrimmage. Keeps his head on a swivel in pass protection, with a very powerful shove to jolt or pancake opposing defensive linemen when helping. Bends at the knees and plays with a solid base to anchor against power; can absorb bull-rushers with ease. Accurate with his hand placement and is capable of resetting and staying engaged against technicians.

Negatives:

Was asked to do some blocking on angles and get out in front of some screens, but range is limited overall by a lack of ideal athleticism, even in a short area. Lacks lateral quickness to recover when caught out of position, a problem which is magnified by what looks like some occasional issues identifying assignments on pasing downs. Has an occasional tendency to lower his head into contact. Will engage with his body instead of his arms at times. Handles power approaches better than gap-shooters because of average to below-average lateral quickness; often has to settle for trying to shove opponents deep instead of mirroring. Might be viewed as more of an inline-only option by teams.

Summary:

Put this guy in a phone booth and let him maul opponents: he’s a very thickly-built, very powerful, and very nasty inline road-grader who can dominate in the run game and stonewall opposing rushers on passing downs as long as he doesn’t have to cover too much ground to work his way into position. Has the look of a potential starter who brings the right attitude to the position and can bully the undersized defensive linemen who the pro game is increasingly being built around.

WR Amon-Ra St. Brown, Southern California* (6’1”, 195)

Background:

Brother is NFL receiver Equanimeous St. Brown. Five-star recruit who burst onto the scene to the tune of 60-750-3 (12.5), then expanded his production to 77-1,042-6 (13.5) before going 41-478-7 (11.7) last year and declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Pretty well-built for the pro receiver position, with above-average height and adequate bulk. Typically lines up on the line of scrimmage split out the left side of the formation, but worked out of the slot often prior to this past season; route tree conists of a lot of patterns with deeper stems (deep out routes, curls, comebacks, etc.), with some hitches throw in for good measure. Able to release at the line of scrimmage against press coverage, showing crisp footwork and effective hand usage. Excellent athlete who eats up cushions in a hurry, does a pretty good job of sinking his hips, and goes through his breaks without needing to shift down very much. Flexibility and body control are good. Looks comfortable catching the ball away from his frame, and can also bring down passes in tight coverage. Demonstrates solid awareness of the sideline. Was able to produce on back-shoulder throws. Shows very good competitiveness which should endear him to pro coaches.

Negatives:

Production predominantly comes on intermediate throws toward the sideline, without that many patterns over the middle of the field or deep downfield. Doesn’t take many snaps from the right side of the field. Patterns from the right side of the formation tend to be simple routes from the slot. Will occasionally settle into coverage underneath instead of finding the soft spots. Made one concentration drop over the middle during the games reviewed. Not the biggest threat to create after the catch in terms of elusiveness or toughness. Gives good effort to engage defenders as a blocker but doesn’t have great functional strength and can struggle to sustain or get overwhelmed by opposing defenders.

Summary:

A pretty polished route-runner from the left side of the formation, combining effective releases at the line, the acceleration to eat up cushions, and the suddenness to create windows on intermediate patterns near the sidelines. Would be a good fit for a scheme that relies on timing-based throws from a quarterback who can get the ball out to the sideline and push it down the field, taking advantage of his precision. However, doesn’t seem to be as much of a threat to take the top off of defenses, so he may need to make his money on short-to-intermediate patterns.

WR Dazz Newsome, North Carolina (5’11”, 190)

Background:

Did a little bit of everything in high school but was often considered a cornerback recruit. However, was used as a receiver from his true freshman season at North Carolina, starting two of nine games the first year and finishing with 18-227-0 (12.6). Started six games the following year and went 44-506-2 (11.5), then became a full-time starter and enjoyed hsi best year as a junior (72-1,018-10, 14.1). Finished his senior year with a 54-684-6 line (12.7).

Positives:

Well-built receiver with adequate size who predominantly lined up in the slot at the college level. A lot of his patterns were either down the seams or on shorter out routes. Willing to mix things up with physical corners near the line of scrimmage. Showcases impressive speed to eat up cushions and get to the route stem or threaten downfield. Can sink his hips and displays snap at the route stem even when he’s working underneath the defense. Able to work the middle of the field; toughness and concentration to hang onto passes through contact are pluses. Hard-charging, no-nonsense rusher who can pick up yards after contact; the team made a point of getting him the ball with some room to work, and he rewarded them by working his way through would-be tacklers for chunks of yardage on a pretty regular basis. Gives pretty good effort as a stalk blocker, although his positioning, placement, and ability to sustain is just adequate. A dangerous return specialist who demonstrates good vision and agility to break big runs.

Negatives:

A little bit on the small side, so it’s not clear how much of a candidate he’ll be for an outside role in the pros. A good portion of his production was manufactured on screens, hitches, and other short throws, and in any case only posted a eye-popping line in his junior campaign. Route-running tools look pretty good, but tree itself was fairly limited, so he’ll have to expand it further, and during the games reviewed did struggle at times to create separation at the stem with double-moves and head-fakes. Wasn’t as frequently targeted downfield as some of his peers in the slot. A lot of his success comes because of his elusiveness, toughness, and competitiveness; not quite the freakish athlete some of the other slot weapons in the class are. Muffed a punt during one of the games reviewed (Syracuse).

Summary:

This class has several receivers who are predominantly slot-based weapons who teams tried to manufacture touches for; not quite as fast or elusive as some of the other options, but makes up for it with toughness and the ability to break tackles. Should be able to endear himself to teams with his gritty and physical style of play, making him a potential second-day pick in this year’s draft.

WR D’Wayne Eskridge, Western Michigan (5’9”, 190)

Background:

Appeared in a reserve capacity as a freshman, catching seventeen passes. Stepped into a starting role the following year and went 30-506-3 (16.9), then saw his production expand to 38-776-3 (20.4) as a junior. Ended up breaking his collarbone four games into his senior year, which led to a medical redshirt; had been playing both receiver and cornerback at that point. Became a full-time receiver again last year, returning kicks as well; line in the passing game was 34-784-8 (23.1).

Positives:

Takes snaps both inside and outside. Has legitimate game-breaking speed; averaged over twenty yards per reception in each of the past two seasons in which he was healthy, and it shows on the field. Can take the top off of a defense or turn a short pass into a huge gain. Eats up cushions in a hurry against off-coverage, which he faced a lot at the college level; importantly, was also able to release with his feet versus press looks, with simple, efficient footwork. Also flashes a swim move to slip by opponents sitting in zone. Cushions he gets open up opportunities for him to run hitches and break over the middle of the field on slants/posts. When he needs to, shows attention to detail and the ability to sink his hips into the stem to create separation for timing-based throws. Able to track and adjust to passes over his shoulder, with good body control. A threat on jet sweeps. Flashes the ability to get physical and drive his legs as a blocker. Should be able to provide immediate value as a kick returner.

Negatives:

Just turned twenty-four years old, so he’s two or three years older than your typical prospect. Was never really a volume receiver in college, relying on big plays for most of his production. On the small side for a pro receiver, particularly one who lines up on the boundaries. Route tree is pretty simple, consisting primarily of go routes, posts, hitches, and screens. Might struggle to release at the line of scrimmage against physical cornerbacks. Development may have been stunted a little bit because of how much opposing defenses respect his speed; tends to round off his routes at the stem because he’s working against off coverages with generous cushions. Doesn’t offer the biggest catch radius or most reliable hands. Would like to see more consistent effort to engage as a stalk blocker; too many plays in which he passes up opportunities to get physical with opposing cornerbacks.

Summary:

A true burner who can threaten defenses downfield, break big gains off of short throws, and contribute in the kicking game, but who is undersized, overaged, and still has to diversify his route tree. Draft stock is difficult to evaluate at this point, but given how important having a legitimate deep threat is to offensive spacing, it would be surprising if he went somewhere on the second day.

WR Seth Williams, Auburn* (6’3”, 211)

Background:

Chose Auburn over the hometown Crimson Tide. Has been a significant contributor in each year with the Tigers, going 26-534-5 (20.5) as a freshman, 59-830-8 (14.1) as a sophomore, and 47-760-4 (16.2) as a junior before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Taks snaps predominantly split out wide to the right side of the formation, with some snaps on the left as well; not working from the slot very frequently. Very well-built for a pro at the position, being one of the biggest top receivers in this year’s class. Pretty smooth mover with some build-up speed. Was targeted on a lot of back-shoulder throws and jump-balls down the field. Offers a large catch radius and is capable of adjusting to passes thrown away from his frame. Capable of coming away with circus catches downfield. Has the flexibility and body control to develop into a red-zone option on fades and back-shoulder throws. Can be elusive when he has room to work with in the open field. Willing to get a little bit more physical when he has the ball in his hands, working in some stiff-arms.

Negatives:

Disappears from games for stretches. Body language looks bad. Needs to play with more aggression and physicality. Should be a dominant blocker but isn’t (see attempted block in the first quarter of the Arkansas game.) Gives very little effort to engage and sustain through the whistle. Can struggle to get separation against press-man coverage, with a lot of his production coming by working into soft spots in/underneath zone coverage shells. Struggles to come down with catches in traffic. Appears to hear footsteps and leaves too many plays on the field in terms of focus drops, etc. Not much of a threat to break tackles or punish smaller defenders with the ball in his hands.

Summary:

Has a great set of physical tools, with an excellent combination of height, length, flexibility, and speed, but doesn’t seem like someone who loves the physicality of the game and is willing to sacrifice for his teammates as a blocker. Could end up as a real weapon if he gets more glass in his diet and plays with passion, but it’s also easier to motivate someone before they have millions of dollars in the bank. Boom-or-bust type whose draft stock will depend heavily on personal interviews and the types of feedback his coaches give to pro teams.

WR Tamorrion Terry, Florida St.* (6’4”, 210)

Background:

Redshirted in 2017, then immediately stepped into a starting role the following year. Finished with a line of 35-744-8 (21.3), then enjoyed an even bigger year in 2019, going 60-1,188-9 (19.8), then was limited to just five games this past year, catching 23-289-1 (12.6) before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Massive wideout who checks all of the boxes from a physical standpoint. Takes snaps all over the formation, both on and off the line and both inside and outside, but almost always from the right side of the formation and usually as a split end. Able to release adequately with technique or with physicality at the line of scrimmage against press. Shows some ability to improvise when the play breaks down. Presents his quarterback with a big target, offering a wide radius and the ability to climb the ladder and win over the top of defenders. Shows good awareness of the sideline. Physical blocker who gets in his seat, extends his arms, gives good effort, and works through and sometimes after the whistle.

Negatives:

Route tree itself is pretty simple, consisting predominantly of getting upfield and working in hitches, curls, and back-shoulder throws off of that. Wasn’t asked to work the middle of the field very often, making a lot of outside releases. Overall speed looks just average and struggles to run past cornerbacks in man coverage; teams felt confident playing him in press-man and not getting beat deep. Not among the best in the class in terms of sinking his hips and exploding out of the route stem; consequently, doesn’t create a lot of separation even on the underneath patterns. Gets pinned to the sideline too easily by smaller cornerbacks when working his way downfield. Not a major threat to create after the catch. Can lapse into catching opponents as a blocker rather than being the aggressor. Physicality is admirable but needs to make sure he keeps his emotions in check to avoid penalties.

Summary:

A big target who can come down with contested catches and jump balls, but whose lack of speed and explosiveness will make it hard for him to win against man coverage at the next level, forcing quarterbacks to trust him to win 50-50 throws. Must dedicated himself to diversifying his route tree and improving his overall route running skills, partiuclarly in terms of sinking his hips into the stem, in order to become more than a low-percentage target and reserve/rotational option.

WR Tutu Atwell, Louisville* (5’9”, 165)

Background:

Was a dual-threat quarterback in high school but converted to receiver when he arrived at Louisville. Finished fourth on the team in receiving as a freshman, posting 24-406-2 (16.9), then stepped into the starting lineup and went 70-1,276-12 (18.2) as a sophomore and 46-625-7 (13.6) as a junior before declaring for the draft.

Positives:

Lined up in the slot for Louisville, often being motioned across the formation prior to the snap. Ran a lot of routes into the flats and was also used as window dressing to pull the defense away from the play direction or to provide an option for jet sweeps or tosses; also commonly targeted on short patterns underneath zone coverage. Can run intermediate/deep corner routes or work across the field on intermediate patterns. A true deep threat speed-wise; eats up cushions quickly and works in head fakes to set up defenders downfield. Has excellent acceleration and top-end speed for the receiver position and is capable of breaking big plays when he finds a crease on sweeps. Looks comfortable plucking the ball away from his frame, with good body control. Can make defenders miss in the open field with impressive stop-start and change-of-direction skills. Pretty competitive, no-nonsense approach after the catch to pick up additional yardage. Gives pretty good effort as a stalk blocker from the slot. Could have been even more productive if not for poorly-thrown deep balls. Only converted to receiver in college so he sshould still have some untapped potential.

Negatives:

Definitely on the smaller side for a pro receiver, even in the slot. May struggle to release at the line of scrimmage against press coverage. Route tree was pretty limited at the college level, with many of his patterns being releases into the flats or clearing routes. Mostly operated under the defense, so didn’t get to see him try to create separation with his release or by sinking his hips into the route stem and exploding out. A lot of his production came on easy throws with loose or nonexistant coverage. Runs himself into some trouble against zone and struggles to shield defenders. Radius is pretty good for his size but doesn’t offer quarterbacks much margin of error on their throws. Struggles to make contested catches. Efficacy as a blocker is constrained by his lack of size/strength. Wasn’t as dangerous this past season as he was in his sophomore campaign. Only returned four points at the college level, all of them coming in his sophomore campaign.

Summary:

An undersized slot receiver who has excellent athleticism but is somewhat difficult to evaluate because his usage at the college level was limited, both in terms of the route tree he tended to run and because he didn’t return punts or line up on the outside of the formation. Could go on the second day but doesn’t answer all of the questions on tape because of how he was used.

WR Tylan Wallace, Oklahoma St. (6’0”, 190)

Background:

Has been a major contributor for the past three seasons after catching seven passes as a freshman. Enjoyed by far his most productive season as a sophomore: 86-1,491-12 (17.3). Followed that up with seasons of 53-903-8 (17.0) in 2019 and 59-922-6 (15.6) in 2020 to close out his collegiate career.

Positives:

Usually takes snaps as a split end on the line of scrimmage; many of his pass routes are outside releases which take him down the sidelines and on related patterns branching off of that (backside throws, etc.), but does make some inside releases and work the inside as well at times. Footwork when releasing is pretty crisp. Physical enough to mix it up with opposing cornerbacks when needed. Long-strider with smooth movement skills; glides down the fast with adequate athletic ability. Maintains inside positioning when working crossing routes, slants, posts, etc. Able to find and settle into the soft spots between zones when working against Cover-2. Provides a big target for quarterbacks because of his length and leaping ability. Has good flexibility and body control. Impressive leaper who can climb the ladder and high-point passes. Runs hard after the catch and is capable of bouncing or spinning off of would-be tacklers to gain additional yardage. Works hard to secure blocks on opposing cornerbacks and engages from his feet; able to come tighter to the formation and crack defenders in the run game. Production was hurt by playing with an inaccurate quarterback.

Negatives:

Snaps come almost exclusively on the far right side of the formation, although he does occasionally slide down into the slot. Doesn’t have the biggest build for an outside receiver. Can be pushed off of his routes by physical press coverage. Gets pinned to the sidelines too easily. Not a true deep threat; smoother and more flexible than he is fast or explosive and doesn’t create many big throwing windows for his quarterback. Didn’t always get some of the big cushions defenses often offer dynamic receivers and struggled to take advantage of those press-man looks (see game vs. Oklahoma). Would like to see him do more different things in the offense; route tree is pretty limited.

Summary:

Comes with three seasons of solid production, but makes for a difficult evaluation, coming as he does from an offensive in which he had relatively simple responsibilities and was playing with a quarterback who struggled to throw him catchable balls downfield. Doesn’t really dominate against press-man coverage the way you’d like for a high draft pick, and given his average size, speed, and explosiveness, may struggle to win on the outside against pro cornerbacks as well.